Winter Baby Blues & Piñata Dreams by Mayra Rocha

I believe most kids love celebrating their birthdays because they get a day devoted to them. They get a party, presents, cake, and games. They get to spend the day doing whatever they want in honor of their day of birth. Well for me, I always wanted a piñata for my birthday. My piñata would be made out of colorful tissue paper, cardboard, and paper mache.

ARIEL2It would be filled with bite-sized candy and chocolate, like Snickers, Skittles and Starburst. But it wouldn’t be your typical, colorful piñata. No, this piñata would be in the shape of Ariel from the Disney movie “The Little Mermaid”. It was my favorite movie growing up as a kid. I had watched this movie on VHS so much and memorized the songs by heart until the video film eventually broke.

This would have been the ideal birthday party for me as kid, except my birthday is in January. Born in one of the coldest months of the year, I suffered through blizzards and freezing temps around my birthday every year. When I was a kid, I had planned a small and simple party for my 9th birthday. Everything was supposed to go great. I’d only invited my close friends. My mom made me a chocolate cake, ordered pizza and had games planned for the party. We even had the usual decorations of balloons and streamers along with birthday-themed party plates and cups for the occasion. But of course I couldn’t have a piñata because the party was indoors. My mom wouldn’t allow kids breaking open a piñata in our 2-bedroom apartment in the south side of Chicago.

To make matters worse, a snowstorm hit on the weekend of my party. None of my friends could make it to my party because of the snowfall. I ended up having the party just with my family that day. Although it was still great having my cake and family there, I still wished that snowstorm didn’t happen. And of course I wished I could have had a piñata too.

It would have been great to be born in the summer months. To be a summer baby, so I could have pool parties, outdoor barbecues at the park or in my backyard, and of course break open a piñata with a bat or broomstick. I would have loved to have the freedom to run around and not worry about being confined in a small space or indoors. I think warm, sunny days outside just make parties so much more fun.

This is what us winter babies have to suffer through. Freezing temperatures and fear of blizzards ruining your birthday plans. I never had the chance to celebrate my birthday party in the outdoors on a hot summer day. I never had the chance to break open the piñata with my friends and run toward the candy falling out of the ripped-open piñata.

It’s no fun celebrating your birthday indoors every year, or living in fear of a snow apocalypse keeping you hostage at home. Especially when kids just want to run around from the sugar high of all the candy and cake they consumed.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m grateful to be alive and healthy, and that I’ve always been able to celebrate my birthday with family, even if it was indoors. But I just wish I could have had an Ariel piñata and a pool party too.

ABOUT MAYRA ROCHA

MAYRA_JUMPERMayra Rocha, a natural-born bookworm and writer from the south side of Chicago, has written articles for Echo, Screen, and Crane Works magazines, and blogs about her experiences from an urban Latina perspective. She was an online contributor for Remilon LLC and wrote engaging articles about online education and degree programs, and the steps involved in following a career path. Mayra has also contributed to Examiner.com, Moments in My Head and Proyecto Latina. She currently works at Groupon and writes for her blog, Avenida M, in her spare time. You can always find her reading a good book, learning a new hobby, traveling to a new destination, or daydreaming.

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